Sea Turtle Hatchling Defended in Blue Planet

Sea Turtle Hatchling

Sea Turtle Hatchling

If you have followed the Blue Planet Life series on Sunday, there is no doubt you must have felt low with littles worries detected over your face as the programme comes to an end.
Before the completion of the programme, about six green sea turtle were hatched into the sea, but unfortunately for one, it became a victim as a hungry seagull fed on it.

Sea Turtle Hatchling

According to Roger Webb, the Blue Planet Live’s executive producer, the scene was so unfortunate.No one can intervene.
As big as the predator- a seagull, it will always focus on the price with its wits and abilities.
Scientist Janine Ferguson and presenter Liz Bonnin released the remaining hatchlings on Heron Island in Australia.
The Live team series said that if the hatchlings were not unearthed by the scientist working on the island, they would have died. Furthermore, the Blue Planet Life team said the hatchlings have been secured from their nest chamber.
They’re all alone without protection, vulnerable to predators, the elements and man-made threats. Liz Bonnin said.
With the pitiful scene, where the hatchling was victimized, viewers reacted by tweeting. Because the presenter should have at least intervened.
A viewer of the Live series tweeted, “Watching Blue Planet Live showed how the scientist help saved the hatchlings that got stuck in the nest but watched a seagull feed on one of them and didn’t even attempt to intervene.
In response, the Blue Planet reminded viewers that the hatchlings make up the food web and the silver gull needs to feed their newborn. Although touching, but we can’t raise a finger to help. #BluePlanetLive
According to Roger Webb, the hatchling is an important part of the gull’s diet.
What you saw happened is nature doing its work. It might seem heartless though, but the hatchling is not wasted but will only form a major aspect of food for the chicks of the gull.
Yet arguments have risen as viewers insist that it was unfair to have released the hatchling while still light and available to predators.
However, Roger said the hatchling was released because the sibling came 2 days ago as first light was emerging. Those still in the nest will be taken back to the beach following situation their siblings emerged.
The hatchlings that would have died in the nest and others who emerged days before received a lifeline through the scientist.
factors, an increase in the number of plastics in the ocean, poaching, pollution, and fishing. Scientist however estimated that out of a thousand green sea turtle hatchling, only one live up to adulthood.
The BBC has faced numerous criticism on its nature coverage. An example is the 2013 series where a dying baby elephant was covered on the programme Africa.
But he said he prefers playing as an observer than a participant.
Green sea turtle lives longer, up to a hundred years, but will be confronted with many life-threatening situations before it survives.
Last year, BBC nature Dynasties series covered where a group of penguins, trapped in a ravine were rescued by team members. The team dug a little hole to enable the willing penguins to escape. The crew decided to act.
The executive producer spoke in defense of the decision, saying that Sir David Attenborough would have also made a shallow ramp for the penguins.
According to Mike Gunton who spoke to BBC, touching the animals wasn’t dangerous, they were not going to suffer if intervened. You were not touching the animals but the help was felt through what you did. They have the opportunity to escape and not slip down the slope.

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